Seminars

See all upcoming seminars in LäsIT and seminar web pages at the homepage for the PhD studentseminars, TDB, Vi2, Theory and Applications Seminars (TAS) @ UpMARC., Department of Mathematics and The Stockholm Logic Seminar.

Vi2 Seminar
Monday 25 Oct
Erik Hallström: Species identification of bacterias using phase-contrast timelapse on microfluidic chip
Location: ITC 4307, Time: 14:15-15:00

Vi2 Seminar by Erik Hallström on Species identification of bacterias using phase-contrast timelapse on microfluidic chip

Abstract
Since its invention antibiotics has saved millions of lives. Today antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria constitutes a huge challenge to health institutions across the globe. In this project we try to classify different species of bacteria looking at their growth in a phase-contrast timelapse on a microfluidic chip. The long term goal is to classify different strains of bacteria and their antibiotic susceptibility.


Zoom link: Click here for Zoom link

HCI seminar
Wednesday 27 Oct
Anton Poikolainen Rosén (Umeå University and Södertörn University): More Than Human Centered-Design: The Case of Urban Farming
, Time: 13:15

Join via Zoom: Click here for Zoom link


Abstract:
User-centered design has been a fundamental part of the development of successful technology. However, this inclination towards human needs implies that less attention has been directed at other non-human actors. The emerging approach of ‘more than human-centered design’ steps away from seeing other organisms as inferior to humans or valuable only as resources. This move means that design research methods need to be augmented, hybridized, and remade. Anton’s thesis work investigates how this could be done more concretely. In the talk, an overview of his design studies and experiments will be presented. A particular focus will be placed on discussing potential final contributions of the thesis work. How can more-than-human theories be made more concretely accessible in design processes?

Related papers
Anton Poikolainen Rosén, Maria Normark, and Mikael Wiberg. 2020. Relating to the Environment Through Photography: The Smartphone Camera as a Tool in Urban Farming. In 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (OzCHI '20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 506–519. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3441000.3441026

Maria Normark, Anton Poikolainen Rosén, and Madeleine Bonow. 2021. Articulating and Negotiating Boundaries in Urban Farming Communities. In C&T ’21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies - Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech (C&T ’21), Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 296–308. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3461564.3461565

Bio
Anton Poikolainen Rosén is a PhD student enrolled in Informatics at Umeå University and employed by the department of Media Technology at Södertörn University, Stockholm. He is in his final year of the PhD, in informatics and interaction design. For the past four years he has conducted a speculative design ethnography of urban farming communities. This research contributes to the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Interaction design and Sustainable ICT.

Disputation | PhD defense
4 November
Lorenzo Corneo: Networked Latency Sensitive Applications - Performance Issues between Cloud and Edge
Location: ITC 2446, Time: 13:15

Lorenzo Corneo will present and defend his PhD thesis Networked Latency Sensitive Applications - Performance Issues between Cloud and Edge.

Opponent: Prof. Anna Brunström (Karlstad University)
Supervisors: Prof. Per Gunningberg, Prof. Christian Rohner, Prof. Jussi Kangasharju (University of Helsinki)

Abstract:
The increasing demand for industrial automation has motivated the development of applications with strict latency requirements, namely, latency-sensitive applications. Such latency requirements can be satisfied by offloading computationally intensive tasks to powerful computing devices over a network at the cost of additional communication latency. Two major computing paradigms are considered for this: (i) cloud computing and (ii) edge computing. Cloud computing provides computation at remote datacenters, at the cost of longer communication latency. Edge computing aims at reducing communication latency by bringing computation closer to the users. This doctoral dissertation mainly investigates relevant issues regarding communication latency trade-offs between the aforementioned paradigms in the context of latency-sensitive applications.

This work advances the state of the art with three major contributions. First, we design a suite of scheduling algorithms which are performed on an edge device interposed between a co-located sensor network and remote applications running in cloud datacenters. These algorithms guarantee the fulfillment of latency-sensitive applications' requirements while maximizing the battery life of sensing devices. Second, we estimate under what conditions latency-sensitive applications can be executed in cloud environments. From a broader perspective, we quantify round-trip times needed to access cloud datacenters all around the world. From a narrower perspective, we collect latency measurements to cloud datacenters in metropolitan areas where over 70% of the world's population lives. This Internet-wide large-scale measurements campaign allows us to draw statistically relevant conclusions concerning the readiness of the cloud environments to host latency-sensitive applications. Finally, we devise a method to quantify latency improvements that hypothetical edge server deployments could bring to users within a network. This is achieved with a thorough analysis of round-trip times and paths characterization resulting in the design of novel edge server placement algorithms. We show trade-offs between number of edge servers deployed and latency improvements experienced by users.

This dissertation contributes to the understanding of the communication latency in terms of temporal and spacial distributions, its sources and implications on latency-sensitive applications.

Half-time seminar
26 November
Virginia Grande: Role modeling in computing: The who, what, how, and why with a focus on higher education
Location: Zoom (link will be published later), Time: 9:15-12:00

Virginia Grande will present her half-time seminar Role modeling in computing: The who, what, how, and why with a focus on higher education

Opponent: Päivi Kinnunen

More information will be published soon.

Disputation | PhD defense
10 December
Rebecca Cort: Getting Work Done: The Significance of the Human in Complex Socio-Technical Systems
Location: Häggsalen, Ångströms, Time: 10:15

Rebecca Cort will present and defend her PhD thesis Getting Work Done: The Significance of the Human in Complex Socio-Technical Systems

Opponent: Prof. Ann Blandford
Supervisor: Prof. Anders Arweström Jansson

More information will be published soon.

Disputation | PhD defense
17 December
Ghafour Ahani: Optimal Scheduling for Timely Information in Communication Systems
Location: ITC 2446, Time: 13:15

Ghafour Ahani will present and defend his PhD thesis Optimal Scheduling for Timely Information in Communication Systems.

Opponent: Prof. Andreas Kassler
Supervisor: Prof. Di Yuan

More information will be published soon.

See also the list of all upcoming seminars.

Internal seminars. Lecturers may be either internal or external.

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